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Night Driving 101

While it may be difficult to tell whether a black shape in front of your headlights is a deer or a pedestrian when you're driving late at night, it's not hard to see why night driving can be so daunting for many drivers. Despite the fact that the majority of driving is done during the day, about 40-50% of accidents occur at night. Luckily, there's no reason that night driving has to be unsafe — with a few simple precautionary measures, you can drive safely, keep your visibility high, and even enjoy the unique experience of an immersive night drive!

  • Turn on your low beams at dusk for better visibility and to be seen. You must drive with low beams at night, when it is raining or with poor visibility. The main beam should be used whenever possible, to avoid dazzling oncoming traffic. Some vehicles are equipped with an automatic dipped beam system that turns the lights on and off depending on exterior light conditions. 90% of the information needed to drive is processed through our sense of sight, and as visual perception decreases at night it takes longer to identify pedestrians, animals or traffic signals. In these cases, LED headlamps are a great ally, as they generate better light quality than halogen bulbs and the light they emit is very similar to daylight, which greatly improves visibility.
  • Adapt your speed to be able to brake within the headlamp range. It is advisable to drive slower than you normally would during the day. The recommended speed when driving with low beams in Spain is 90 km/h.
  • Maintain a safe distance leaving a margin of no less than three seconds between you and the car in front of you.
  • Recognise early signs of fatigue such as if your eyelids get heavy, if you have trouble staying within your lane or if it is hard to remember where you have driven in the last kilometre. Drowsiness affects your reflexes and the effect is similar to driving with a blood alcohol level of 0.5 grams per litre. At the first signs of drowsiness it is important to stop and rest or sleep until you can safely continue on your journey. Some vehicles are equipped with a drowsiness detector that identifies when the driver is tired and displays a warning sign on the instrument panel that recommends taking a break.

There are no bad cars, only bad drivers. It's up to the operator to stay alert, especially at night, when road dangers wax and alertness wanes. By following these tips you won’t have any problems reaching your destination safely and securely.

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